Peeled Eggs, Onions or Garlic Overnight (Part 3)

Other Possible Exceptions

1. The Gemara states a possible exception to the rule and that is if some of the original outer layer, peel, shell, or root hairs remain, then one need not worry about Ruach Ra’ah, as it is not considered to be peeled.

2. The Smak (171) understands this to mean that the shell or hair can protect the food even if they were completely removed and later added back. Klausenberger Rebbe zt”l, in his Sefer Divrei Yetziv, maintains that the basic understanding of the Gemara is that the food is only protected if there is at least one piece of hair or shell which was never removed from the food but it would not suffice to add pieces of peel or hair to a fully peeled egg etc. He feels that this is also the view of Harav Yaakov Emden zt”l (Divrei Yetziv Y.D. 31:14). In the Daf Hakashrus (ibid.) it states that Rav Belsky shlit”a rules in accordance with the Divrei Yetziv.

3. The Sefer Yad Meir (19) introduces a novel concept. He writes that one may wash the food to remove the ruach ra’ah. However, most authorities disagree and feel that rinsing the food does not help. (see Minchas Yitzchak 6:74, Divrei Yetziv ibid. Malbim in Ortzos Hachaim 4:32 and Shemiras Haguf V’Nefesh page 27)

4. The Klausenberger Rebbe zt”l discusses his uncertainty if the prohibition applies to foods that were peeled during the night, and therefore were not peeled for the entire night. He writes that in his view the custom seems to be that there is only a concern if it was left peeled for the entire night.

5. Harav Moshe Feinstein zt”l (Igros Moshe Y.D. 3:20) was asked whether there is a leniency for a commercial bakery, which has trays of unused leftover eggs etc.. Harav Moshe suggests that since we do not understand how ruach ra’ah operates we cannot extend the Gemara’s warning to any cases other than those mentioned specifically. Therefore, we can assume that the Gemara is discussing a typical case of a housewife who peeled an egg and accidentally left it overnight or who peeled an egg today with the intention of eating it tomorrow. However, the Gemara is not discussing a company which cracks eggs which will not be used for many weeks or months. Therefore, we do not have to be concerned for ruach ra’ah in such cases.

However, the seforim Mishnah Halachos (11:21) and Divrei Yatziv (ibid.) did not allow any dispensation for industrially produced items, and exhorted extreme caution with all facets of this halacha, ruling that peeled overnight eggs, onions or garlic are strictly prohibited.

In the Daf Hakashrus it states, “Rav Belsky and Rav Schachter were both of the opinion that the OU could rely on Igros Moshe. This would provide a basis for the certification of all commercial egg, garlic and onion products but would not permit a caterer to crack eggs for the next day’s breakfast or to cut onions and garlic for the next day’s salad.”

Moreover, it is worthwhile to read Rav Yisrael Belsky’s (Shulchan Halevi page 211) strongly worded defense of Rav Moshe’s opinion. He writes that since the issue at hand is one of spiritual danger, once the universally recognized Gadol HaDor rules that it does not apply, it is certain that no spiritual contamination will affect someone who relies on his ruling – see Gemara Pesachim 112b.

6. The Gemara explicitly states that even if the peeled onion is covered and wrapped up, it is still susceptible to ruach ra’ah. Therefore many authorities rule that even if one wraps the peeled egg or garlic up well and then puts it in the fridge, it is still forbidden to be eaten.

7. Harav Belsky, based upon the previously mentioned view of Harav Moshe Feinstein, notes that although the Gemara rules that placing the peeled egg in a sealed container does not protect it from the ruach ra’ah, this may not apply to eggs which are placed in a hermetically sealed container.

8. Another opinion cited by the Darkei Teshuva is that ruach ra’ah does not affect dried onion powder, garlic powder or powdered eggs, as not only are they not considered the original food item, but they are not even considered a food at all, rather a powder. Harav Ovadia Yosef zt”l (Yabia Omer Y.D. 2:8) agrees with this opinion and says that Rav Tzvi Pesach Frank permitted powdered eggs for this reason. In the Daf Hakashrus it states, “Rav Belsky held that the only basis for such a difference would be the view of Harav Moshe Feinstein zt”l cited above who states that the danger only applies to eggs prepared in the typical manner.”

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